Goodbye from the 2016/2017 Committee!

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The targets we set ourselves for 2016/2017 and how we have met them:

  • Instagram followers increased from 67 to 176 (annual target = 80)
  • Facebook members increased from 218 to 310 (annual target = 261)
  • Twitter followers increased from 335 to 507 (annual target = 402)

What a year it has been!

We are proud to say that in one year we have raised £949.24 for a variety of different causes: the Motor Neurone Disease Association, British Sign Language courses for students, Headway, The Stroke Association and Downright Excellent. This has been in many different forms, from bake sales to documentary showings and a Christmas concert with a great turn out from staff, students and the community.

We have also been proactive in raising awareness of various speech, language communication and swallowing needs and the role of the SLT. We held Express BSL lessons to raise awareness of the Deaf community, we held online campaigns to encourage people to discuss important themes in Speech and Language Therapy, we held a dysphagia awareness event focussing on patient experience, and we had an Augmentative, Alternative Communication treasure hunt in the community, which encouraged passer-by’s to stop and ask questions. Our MND documentary screening of “Filming My Father: In Life and Death” was a particularly successful event that sold 44 tickets to a wide variety of people who had the unique opportunity to discuss their immediate thoughts, feelings and questions about the battle with MND with the son of the man in the documentary. The £200 we raised from this event was enough to fund an MND researcher for just over a day, or to fund laboratory equipment for 4 day’s vital research into finding out the causes of MND.

Here are some final words from each member of the 2016/2017 committee:

President – Ali Boston

thumb_img_2960_1024As budding speech and language therapists, we’re taught to be reflective practitioners. This means both celebrating the things that go well, and challenging ourselves to think about how we can do things better. Looking back on the past year of the UCL Giving Voice society, I feel that we have lots to celebrate. We reached more people than ever before with the Giving Voice message through social media, raised nearly £1000 for a range of charities, and provided a platform for people with speech, language, communication and swallowing difficulties to be heard.

Personally, this year has been both challenging and inspiring. It has been an absolute privilege to work with this committee – a group of people putting their exceptional skills to whatever task at hand with passion and dedication. It is rare to find such a group that will think creatively, will set high expectations for themselves, will take initiative to overcome challenges, and will roll up their sleeves and get their hands dirty (sometime literally) with no complaints. I will always remember the buzz of excitement surrounding each event or campaign we held this year, and the sense of accomplishment when each was over and we knew we’d done our part to make a difference.  

A particular highlight for me was partnering with the UCL Communication Clinic to support them at the Bloomsbury Festival, where our brave volunteers engaged with over 150 members of the public to raise awareness about the challenges of living with aphasia and the role of SLTs in helping people to overcome those challenges.

Thank you to all our society members this year for doing your part; to all the people who contributed to running events; to those who attended/gave money to/read about our activities; to Giving Voice central for all their support; and especially to this year’s committee.  I look forward to seeing what the UCL Giving Voice society gets up to in future!

Vice President – Sophie Trevis-Smith

aacBeing part of the Giving Voice Committee has been both challenging and rewarding in equal measures! Each event has brought about it’s own unique hurdles! However, I have been continually amazed at how the committee has been able to pull together to overcome these! Not only that, but I have been overwhelmed by the fantastic support we have received from our society’s members and from the general public! Thank you to everyone who has supported the society this year!

A highlight (although there were many for me!) was hosting the Taster Evening in October. I loved this event because we were able to share information about Speech, Language and Communication Needs with a diverse range of students from a variety of academic backgrounds. This was made especially enjoyable due to the enthusiasm of the attendees! Good luck to the new committee- I know you’ll do an amazing job!

Treasurer – James Eastman

dsc_0589Being part of the Giving Voice Committee this year has, although difficult at times, been a lot of fun! It’s been great to work alongside so many talented people who have worked so hard to make each event such a success. Each event has thrown different challenges and obstacles at us, but each time it’s been a group effort to get through everything and put on events which (we hope!) everyone that has attended has enjoyed and taken something from. It’s been a great sideline from all the work and stressful times of the course and each time an event has come around it’s been a fantastic reminder of why we put ourselves forward!

A particular highlight of the year for me was helping to organise and run the Christmas Carol Concert alongside Abbi. This event posed particular challenges right up to the day it took place, but with everyone’s help we managed to put on a really fun and enjoyable event. I’ve never organised something like that before, but the feedback we got from everyone who came and the from the choirs who took part, definitely made it all worth it! Thank you to everyone who came to all the events, and to the committee for people such a great group to work with!!

Social Secretary – Mahie Sumathipala

SwallowAware-10Being a part of the Giving Voice Committee this year was such an incredible experience. Working with a team of individuals who are whole heartedly dedicated to this profession made it all the more enjoyable. The whole team worked tirelessly over the last year to host a range of unique and educational events and it has been such a pleasure to be a part of introducing other individuals to the wonderful world of Speech and Language Therapy. We have had such huge support from lots of people, but we have been especially lucky to have met individuals who were willing to get involved with Giving Voice events and share their personal stories about living with or knowing someone with speech, communication and swallowing difficulties.

One of my favourite events was the Dysphagia awareness event as this is an area that not a lot of people know that SLTs are involved with. I wish the next committee the very best of luck and to continue raising awareness about speech, language, communication and swallowing difficulties. Most importantly, I hope GV continues to educate and break down societal boundaries that individuals living with these difficulties face in day to day life.

Social Secretary – Abbi Songhurst

dsc_0484It has been an absolute blast working with this group of lovely people this year as part of the GV society. I have thoroughly enjoyed raising awareness of the profession and conditions that can cause speech, language communication or swallowing needs.

A particular highlight for me was coordinating a choir of children from the charity Downright Excellent, who came to sing and sign at our Christmas concert. It was amazing to see their confidence on stage and to see the public celebrating the success of these children. I hope that this is something future societies continue as it was such a success for the audience, the children and their families. I am so excited to see what the next committee have in store and wish you every success!

Social Secretary – Bridget Yu

SwallowAware-18It has been an amazing experience working with these lovely people. By being part of the GV committee, not only have I learnt a lot more on communication and swallowing difficulties, most importantly I have enjoyed myself in all the activities.

My favourite one was the swallowing awareness event in March. It was very satisfying to see that those who came were genuinely interested and have gained a lot through the event. A huge thank you to everyone who has helped or come to any of our events. Great work team!!

Publicity Officer – Chloe Thomson

word-findingI am really glad that I got to be a part of this year’s Giving Voice Committee and that I was able to support the events and campaigns run by the society. Pushing forward GV’s agenda, raising awareness of Speech Therapy, as well as giving a voice to people with speech, language, communication and swallowing needs has been so rewarding.

A highlight for me was running an introductory event last year to show people who may never have had any contact with Giving Voice what is really all about! It was amazing to see how much hard work the committee put in, as well as how interested people were in Giving Voice’s message.

Overall, I have loved having the opportunity to raise awareness of a field of work so close to my heart. The whole community surrounding and supporting people with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) and swallowing difficulties are a wonderfully passionate bunch – but most of all I have enjoyed seeing those people with SLCN or swallowing difficulties have the opportunity to advocate and represent themselves. I look forward to carrying on working in this field and wish the best of luck to the new committee!

Publicity Officer –  Reanne Coleman

screenshot-4I’m so pleased that I decided to run for one of the Publicity Officer positions this year. Not only has it been good to focus on something apart from our deadlines, it’s been empowering and uplifting to be part of a society who have worked so hard to promote the amazing work of Speech & Language Therapists and raise public awareness about speech, communication and swallowing difficulties.

A highlight for me was the AAC Treasure Hunt that I co-ran with our President, Ali. It was probably one of the most complicated events that I’ve ever had to organise but it was also great fun and it proved to be a success! Most importantly, we were able to be outreaching and promote the work of SLTs to members of the public who were simply curious to find out why we were standing at random landmarks around central London!

Overall, I found being a member of the committee a thoroughly enjoyable experience and I know this was only possible thanks to the fantastic group of people around me who all pitched in to help wherever they could to make every event work. I wish the new committee every success and look forward to seeing what you get up to on social media!

Communications Secretary – Hollie St John Wright

SwallowAware-18Being part of Giving Voice this year has been brilliant! Not only have I really enjoyed myself, but it’s been fun working so closely with my fellow committee members and actually feeling like we’re making a difference outside our little speechie bubble. It’s been so rewarding feeling like we’ve reached out to new people and sparked a genuine interest in communication and swallowing needs (particularly at our dysphagia event), and I’m really excited to follow the new committee and see where they will take Giving Voice next!

Personally, being part of Giving Voice this year has given me an extra reminder about why I’m doing what I’m doing: training to become a Speech and Language Therapist. For many of us on the MSc course, there have been some really difficult times with what feels like constant deadlines, but Giving Voice and all it stands for, and my lovely committee have kept my passion going! What a year it’s been!

Communications Secretary – Kim Talbot

img-20161026-wa0034Putting myself forward for the Giving Voice Committee was a step out of my comfort zone but I haven’t regretted a single moment! In fact, it’s made me more determined to get involved in ‘extracurricular activities’ in the future.

I’ve been very lucky to work alongside an amazing, supportive team of people who have such creative and innovative ideas. I’ve really enjoyed all the events we have run together to promote Speech and Language Therapy, as well as the clients we will work with in the future. I’ve particularly enjoyed being able to use my creative side to create all the posters for events and to write this blog! We have managed to raise nearly £1000 for a variety of charities and it’s amazing to consider what that money will go towards. 

A particular highlight for me was the Bake Sale I ran for the Stroke Association. I was overwhelmed by the support we had from everyone in Chandler House, and I never imagined it possible to raise over £200 from one day of cake selling!

As I start my career in Speech and Language Therapy, I aim to continue raising awareness of our profession and advocating for the clients we work with. Best of luck to the new committee!

Year A Representative – Liz Douglas

20170201_195352I have loved being in the committee this year. It has given me so many experiences to learn more about speech and language therapy, meet a variety of people and to help spread the word about speech and language therapy. 

The highlight for me would be meeting Frazer, whose father had motor neurone disease, and learning about the impact of language difficulties on a family and what they found supported them. I will bring the experiences and all that I have learnt into my future career.

Some feedback we have received from UCL staff:

“The enthusiasm, quality and breadth of engagement activities have been outstanding over the year. The Society has welcomed UCL students who are not studying SLT not only to events but also as members of the committee. The events have disseminated information within UCL but also fostered robust links with service users, charities (e.g. the MND Society) and members of the public (e.g. activities at the Bloomsbury Festival). As Head of Department, I offer sincere and deep thanks for all the Society has done this year to spread the word about speech, language and swallowing difficulties, the people who experience them and the importance of services for them.”

Rosemary Varley – Chair of Acquired Disorders of Language Communication UCL

“This year’s UCL Giving Voice committee have been a model of how to work collaboratively and promote enthusiasm and innovation.  They have organised a series of interesting events to promote awareness of speech and language difficulties.  These were well attended, not only by UCL speech and language therapy students but also by students on other courses and friends.  They have increased their social media presence in a remarkable way.  For example, they now have 491 followers on Twitter.”

Rachel Rees – Senior Teaching Fellow UCL

‘The UCL Giving Voice Society’ is now an established part of our community, reaching beyond SLT students and staff.  The committee has recognised the importance of social engagement. It has been a privilege to witness their enthusiasm and commitment to SLT and the shared understanding of people with communication and swallowing disabilities.’

Steven Bloch – Senior Lecturer UCL

“We are very proud of the continued success of the UCL Giving Voice Society, which has gone from strength to strength. The Committee continues to organise a range of interesting and varied activities that have been highly effective in raising the profile of speech, language, communication and swallowing needs both across the student body and also in the local community.  In addition, they have raised money for a number of charities working to support people with SLC and EDS needs.  The committee is a veritable model of teamworking and leadership and shows evidence of wholehearted commitment to the SLT profession.  I do not hesitate to recommend them.”

Carol Sattchett- Principal Teaching Fellow UCL

As you can see, we have all thoroughly enjoyed our time on the UCLU Giving Voice committee and wish the new committee luck in the coming year! Thank you again for all of your ongoing support.

twitterlogoUCLU Giving Voice Committee

Facebook: UCLU Giving Voice Society

Twitter: @GivingVoice_UCL

Instagram: uclugivingvoice

Email: ucl.givingvoice@gmail.com

 

Celebrating What Makes You You


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From the 11th June to the 16th June, UCLU Giving Voice ran a social media campaign celebrating the talents of people who have speech, language and communication needs (SLCN), to encourage people to not see disability before ability. People were encouraged to share any great experiences they may have had with an individual they have met, or a wonderful charity, that celebrates people who have a speech, language or communication need.

Articles, stories and quotes were posted throughout the week and some topics discussed were around acting with SLCN and representation of people with SLCN  in popular culture.

UCLU Giving Voice managed to make 10.2K impressions on twitter during the campaign,as opposed to our 200-300 average impressions per week. We had 361 interactions on twitter and 55 likes on Instagram. We even got retweeted by Lost Voice Guy!

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Our most popular posts were quotes from UCL lecturers Steven Bloch and Stefanie Bucher who discussed the importance of communication and how rewarding being a Speech and Language Therapist can be.

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Thank you to everyone who engaged in this social media campaign – we hope we’ve highlighted the importance of seeing ability before disability, and celebrating what makes you you!

twitterlogoUCLU Giving Voice Committee

Facebook: UCLU Giving Voice Society

Twitter: @GivingVoice_UCL

Instagram: uclugivingvoice

Email: ucl.givingvoice@gmail.com

UCLU Giving Voice Swallowing Awareness Day 2017

To raise awareness of swallowing difficulties this year, the UCLU Giving Voice Committee decided to combine a twitter campaign with an interactive, informative swallowing awareness evening, encouraging guests to consider the client’s perspective.

Screen Shot 2017-05-01 at 21.06.53In the 11 days leading up to our main event, we posted articles, images and videos all about dysphagia across social media. Some of these were to share information about prevalence of dysphagia, and others were to pose questions, such as the role of Apps in the management of dysphagia. During this period, we received 6,400 twitter impressions, 314 twitter engagements, 138 likes on Instagram, and managed to get 52 people signed up to our event.

Our focus for the Swallowing Awareness Event was on patient experience. We wanted to help people better understand the psychosocial impact of dysphagia on patients, and to engage with quality of life issues for this group of people. Importantly, we wanted to celebrate all that speech and language therapists do to make a difference for people with swallowing difficulties.

Dr Jane Warren, neurologist, opened the evening by talking about what a normal swallow looks like, and gave an engaging insight into the complexity of the mechanism which so many people take for granted when it is working ok. Guests were intrigued and didn’t hold back with their questions, which ranged from the impact of cleft lip and palate on swallowing, to why people might drool more in their sleep!

We were lucky enough to have a patient generously share their story about their dysphagia following cancer; and to tell guests about how his swallowing had improved with the help of his speech and language therapist. It was poignant to think about the lasting impact of his difficulties, and how it has resulted in him having to think about not only how this affects him, but also his loved ones.

We used many of the materials provided by the RCSLT on their Swallowing Awareness page to frame each of the stalls during the second part of our evening in order to give guests a hands-on experience of how speech and language therapists assess, diagnose and treat patients with dysphagia.

SwallowAware-6.jpgThe first stall was the assessment stage of dysphagia management. Guests were able to experience having an oro-motor and swallow exam, and to understand the steps taken when assessing dysphagia, for example the need for Videofluoroscopy and FEES. Videos of these helped bring to life the mechanism with Dr Warren had explained and gave guests an opportunity to hear about how speech and language therapists work closely with other members of a multidisciplinary team as part of the assessment and treatment process.

There was some great feedback with pause for thought for all budding speech and language therapists: guests indicated that having their throat palpated could be intimidating, but that this was made better when the speech and language therapist explained what they were doing. The best part of the assessment process according to the guests was having an opportunity to express their concerns about their swallowing and have someone listen to their questions.

The second stall involved information about swallowing techniques and postural changes used to help patients with dysphagia. Guests were given the chance to practice modelling the exercises to Giving Voice committee members. We had a poll on the stall asking people to vote on a scale from “Comfortable” to “Not comfortable at all” about how they would feel using such strategies in a restaurant. Most people voted towards “not at all comfortable”, due to it feeling ‘awkward or embarrassing’. Many guests commented that it would depend if the exercises were time consuming or noticeable, and that it would likely affect where they would choose to sit in a restaurant. Overall, the poll provoked many interesting discussions about the psychosocial impact of swallowing and how much of an impact if would have on many of the activities most of us take for granted.

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At the third stall, guests had the opportunity to find out more about different thickened fluids by making and tasting their own, and comparing the impact of thickener on different drinks. Questions were raised about whether this would encourage an individual to maintain adequate hydration, and realistically how appealing this would be on a long-term basis. Guests commented that they would be more willing to drink thickened squash, as it was similar to jelly, but the water would be more difficult to bring themselves to drink, and that it would not psychologically satisfy the need to quench their thirst.

SwallowAware-13.jpgGuests also had the opportunity to see and try different levels of pureed foods. They were initially put off by the appearance of the foods in their unrecognizable states. They stated that they would find it difficult to follow a Speech and Language Therapist’s recommendation to follow such a diet modification. A brave few tried some of the thin puree brocolli, carrot and potato, and nobody recognised the vanilla sponge cake!

A few guests reported they had seen recently in the news about work in care homes to present pureed food in a way that means each individual food is recognisable. 100% of the guests asked reported they would find mealtimes more appetising with pureed food presented in this way, showing that enjoying food and maintaining adequate nutrition is heavily dependent on not only the taste of food, but also the appearance.SwallowAware-18.jpg

Finally, guests were able to bravely experience what it was like to feed someone else and be fed. Guests commented that it was an intimate experience, and reflected how important it is that people with swallowing difficulties who need assistance are not left out of experiencing eating as a social activity.

SwallowAware-14.jpgWe challenged people to sort different foods into ‘high risk’ and ‘low risk’ for people with mild swallowing difficulties. Some guests said that they’d never thought about food as being something risky, and were surprised by how many of their favourite foods were on the ‘high risk’ list.

 

We were impressed by the insightful questions raised and the engagement with all our activities. Overall, this event was a success in challenging people to think about the psychosocial impact of a swallowing difficulty by enabling them to consider this management process from a client’s perspective.

twitterlogoUCLU Giving Voice Committee

Facebook: UCLU Giving Voice Society

Twitter: @GivingVoice_UCL

Instagram: uclugivingvoice

Email: ucl.givingvoice@gmail.com

Express BSL 2017

Express British Sign Language (BSL) returned for another year in collaboration with the UCLU Sign Language Society, with great success.

The UCLU Sign Language Society opened the session with a discussion on Deaf awareness and the need for non-verbal forms of communication. They then covered basic BSL such as the alphabet, greetings and conversational BSL. By the end of the session, people were able to hold a conversation with each other in BSL – most of whom had no previous knowledge of sign language!

UCLU Sign Language Society run casual classes all year which can give you a firm grounding in BSL, or official classes in level 1 or 2 and frequent socials for practising your signing. We had a great turnout of students from Medical and Speech and Language Sciences degrees, and together we raised £76, which will offer subsidised BSL lessons for members of the UCLU Sign Language Society who may otherwise not be able to afford it.  You can access their presentation here: Express-BSL.

On Wednesday March 15th, UCLU Sign Language Society are holding an event with The Deafness, Cognition and Language Research Centre (DCAL), where they will deliver an all important Deaf awareness talk , to let the world know what UCL is doing to make students more Deaf aware. DCAL, based at UCL, brings together leading Deaf and hearing researchers in the fields of sign linguistics, psychology, and neuroscience. You can find out more here: Event Information.

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UCLU Giving Voice Committee

Facebook: UCLU Giving Voice Society

Twitter: @GivingVoice_UCL

Instagram: uclugivingvoice

Email: ucl.givingvoice@gmail.com

UCLU Giving Voice Annual AAC Treasure Hunt 2016

October is International AAC (Augmentative and Alternative Communication) Awareness Month and what better way to raise awareness of AAC that by getting people to experience it first-hand!

Some Key Facts on AAC:

  • It is used as a way to replace speech or to support speech in individuals with communication difficulties.
  •  AAC can also be used to help these individuals to understand what others are saying.
  • There are lots of different types of AAC. Signing, eye gaze, alphabet charts, ipad apps and voice output systems are all forms of AAC.
  • If you’ve ever given someone a “thumbs up” or waved goodbye, you’ve used AAC!
  • AAC is used by people of all ages. It is mainly used by people with Parkinson’s, Motor Neurone Disease, dementia, Alzheimers, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Learning Difficulties, and Cerebral Palsy.
  •  Approximately 652,000 people in the UK benefit from using AAC (Scope, 2008)
  • You can find more information here: http://www.communicationmatters.org.uk/page/what-is- aac

Last year UCLU Giving Voice held a successful AAC Treasure Hunt and we have decided to make this an annual event. With committee members scattered around the Bloomsbury area, armed with low tech AAC devices, challenges and clues, the participants had to race to the finish line to win prizes.

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Teams meeting in the UCL Quad, getting ready to set off on the hunt. 

To start off the event, tokens were hidden around the UCL Main Campus and the team who could find the most had a head start in their journey to the first location. Committee members were easily identifiable around the area with ‘ASK ME’ signs and big glowing pink balloons.

We were surprised by the number of people not taking part in the event who stopped and asked us about what we were doing. This was a great opportunity to explain what Giving Voice was, what this event was aiming to do and where they can find out more information. None of the general public had heard of Giving Voice or AAC before, and it was often a mention of Stephen Hawking that made them understand. A member of staff from an underground station was particularly interested in Giving Voice as she said she wished she could received more training on supporting people with communication difficulties, owing to the fact that she comes in contact with them regularly.

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Teams using their Communication Boards to ask for help. 

Once teams reached their first location, they had to use their BoardMaker Communication Boards to ask for help, and were then given a written clue by committee members. If they needed further clues, participants were encouraged to continue using their AAC rather than resorting to using verbal language. Many participants realised how limiting this could be and would often search their communication boards for things they wanted to say, and had to use gestures to fill in the rest.

There were 5 locations around Bloomsbury that the teams had to find, and each location employed a different form of low tech AAC,  including image boards, yes/no cards, pen and paper, alphabet boards and fingerspelling. Once all 5 locations had been visited, they would eventually be signposted to the final mystery destination, which was, of course, a bar!

Throughout the course of the evening there were various challenges that the teams were encouraged to complete in order to shave minutes off of their final time. These included “Buy something for £1 using only AAC to communicate” and “Ask as many people as possible what the time is without using your voice”. A particular favourite was asking teams to spell GIVING VOICE with their bodies!

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‘Giving Voice’ letters formed with their bodies!

Additional fun challenges led to 5 random objects being collected, one stranger being videoed using AAC, 10 members of the public being spoken to about AAC, 22 instances of asking for the time without using words and 5 items being bought in local shops using only AAC. One team discussed the challenges they faced when buying an item in a shop: they found it hard to get the shop attendant’s attention without using words, as he was on the Screenshot_20161020-142327.pngphone. They then felt that he was trying to look at all the symbols on the communication board rather than the symbol that the team member was pointing to, which she found frustrating.

Overall the event was another huge success for UCLU Giving Voice. We had 25 people attend from a variety of courses including Computer Science, Psychology and Linguistics. Participants were eager and committed to using their AAC devices and were creative in the ways they tried to communicate for example demonstrating their knowledge of Makaton Sign!

This event gave attendees the chance to experience use of low tech AAC to replace speech. Some said AAC was fairly intuitive, but reflected that there were additional options on devices such as the communication board that they didn’t use but thought could have helped them in some interactions. This led to conversations about the need to promote uptake of AAC devices by thinking about the user’s needs and competence, and ensure there is support and training for users. One team member stated that AAC provided a shared experience, such as the letter board, because everyone could see what was being typed. This led to a conversation about

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Teams using their Communication Boards to ask for help.

attitudes towards AAC, and the fact that there are types of AAC that are becoming more ingrained in everyday life. For example, the increased use of everyday devices that require typing may mean that AAC may no longer be perceived as ‘odd’ or ‘different’.

The event ended in the UCLU Library Bar where some participants even used AAC to order pizza. The man who served them was not phased at all and engaged easily with their Boardmaker Communication Board. He said it seemed to “make sense” and was appreciative when complimented on his good communication skills.

Team One were the overall winners of the 2016 AAC Treasure Hunt, and received a little parcel of goodies. Congratulations to team one! Head over to our social media pages to see more photos and videos from the evening.

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UCL Giving Voice Committee

Facebook: UCLU Giving Voice Society

Twitter: @GivingVoice_UCL

Instagram: uclugivingvoice

 

Bloomsbury Festival 2016

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The Bloomsbury Festival is a creative celebration of art, culture and science which takes place each October with over 130 events held over five days. This year’s events are inspired by the theme LANGUAGE, and UCL will open the gates of the Main Quad on Saturday 22nd October from 11am – 5pm to host a range of exciting activities “Beyond Words – A day to play with a sideways slant on language”.

UCLU Giving Voice are proud to be involved and support the UCL Communication Clinic in raising awareness about the challenges of living with aphasia. We will be helping the public get involved with an interactive art exhibit about “Lost Words”; surveying the public about how they feel communicating with people who have aphasia; and facilitating the interaction of artists who have aphasia with the public as they display their artwork.

UCLU Giving Voice members will have EXCLUSIVE PREFERENCE in being able to volunteer for this event. We will be holding some optional drop-in lunchtime training before the event for anyone who is super-keen but a bit nervous about the opportunity to support people living with aphasia.

Become a Giving Voice member today and look out for the email on Tuesday 18th October with instructions for how to volunteer for the Bloomsbury Festival and details about training.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to get in touch via social media.

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UCL Giving Voice Committee

Facebook: UCLU Giving Voice Society

Twitter: @GivingVoice_UCL

Instagram: uclugivingvoice