“Filming My Father: In Life and Death”

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On February 1st 2017, UCLU Giving Voice held a documentary screening of20170201_172127Filming My Father: In Life and Death“, an award-winning documentary providing an insight into one family’s battle with Motor Neurone Disease (MND).

MND is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that prevents the motor neurones in the body from working properly. The MND Association reveal that up to 5,000 people in the UK are living with MND at any one time, and it kills more than half within 2 years of diagnosis.

Your motor neurones send messages to your muscles and are therefore involved in day-to-day activities without us even thinking about it, such as eating and breathing. Whilst the effects vary from person to person, MND leads to weakness and wasting of muscles, causing loss of mobility in arms and legs, and difficulties with speech, swallowing and breathing.

The evening opened with a talk from Steven Bloch, a senior lecturer at UCL, who discussed the role of a Speech and Language Therapist working with people with MND. 

Speech and Language Therapists are key in providing support and intervention surrounding progressive swallowing and speech difficulties with MND. They work on maximising existing speech abilities as well as preparing for the future by encouraging legacy work and the potential for recording a client’s voice for use of alternative electronic means of communication. They also assist the client’s support network with their communication and interaction with their loved one.

As seen in this documentary, people with MND will likely require an Alternative Augmentative Communication system, such as an iPad or an eye-tracking device, to communicate when they are no longer able to produce verbal output. The Speech and Language Therapist would be required to advise around this topic, as well as train clients and families how to communicate with this new equipment.

As the muscles in the mouth and throat weaken, the Speech and Language Therapist will also be required for swallowing assessment and review. They will monitor the client’s ability to swallow and will make recommendations on their diet. This may mean having softer, pureed food, or could eventually mean advising that a tube is inserted directly to the stomach so that the client can be fed via a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube, eliminating the risk of any food or fluid entering the lungs due to a weak swallow.

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Fraser sporting a Giving Voice t-shirt with our Vice President, Sophie, and Social Secretary, Mahie.

We were lucky enough to have Fraser present on the evening to answer some questions after people had watched the documentary. Fraser created the majority of the content for the documentary by filming his father’s journey with MND over the years, and was able to provide us with amazingly honest and insightful answers to the many questions asked.

Overall, the event was a great success. The Motor Neurone Disease Association were kind enough to provide us with lots of resources for the event, and we provided every audience member with information sheets about MND, as well as popcorn and a bag of sweets.

From ticket sales and donations, UCLU Giving Voice raised £200 for the Motor Neurone Disease Association (MNDA). 44 people attended, 28 of which were UCLU Giving Voice Society members, but also staff, speech and language therapy students, students from other courses and friends showed up to support this event. 
20170201_191159The event was successful at not only providing people with the opportunity to see this amazing documentary, but also providing them with the unique opportunity to discuss their immediate thoughts, feelings and questions about the battle with MND with Fraser, and we received some great feedback.

“It made me feel appreciative of my family and how lucky we are. I learned about the impact that degenerative diseases can have on other family relationships and how it can push people apart at the same time as bringing them together”

“I was very moved by the film, it made me really think about life and death and what really matters. It was quite painful to watch but I’m definitely glad I did. I didn’t really know much about MND before so it taught me about the disease and its progression. It gave me an insight into what it’s like to have MND but also how difficult it must be to see a family member suffering.”

“It highlighted the impact of the role of the family in the care of a loved one. A patient shouldn’t just be seen as a patient, supporting the family in the how to communicate with the patient is equally as important”

– Feedback from the event

Many thanks to Fraser for being part of the event, and to everyone who attended and donated. Based on information provided by MNDA, here is what your £200 could be going towards:

  • 20 information packs for newly diagnosed people with MND
  • 6 adapted cutlery sets to help someone with MND continue to feed themselves
  • Funding an MND researcher for just over a day
  • Running the MND Connect support information line for 2 hours
  • Funding laboratory equipment for 4 day’s vital research into finding out the causes of MND
  • Producing 40 copies of ‘So what is MND anyway?’, a guide for young people affected by MND

Click here to see some of the highlights from Fraser’s Q&A session, after showing the documentary.

For the most recent updates following the filming of ‘Filming My Father: In Life and Death’, like the Facebook page.

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UCLU Giving Voice Committee

Facebook: UCLU Giving Voice Society

Twitter: @GivingVoice_UCL

Instagram: uclugivingvoice

Email: ucl.givingvoice@gmail.com

Documentary trailer:

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FFilmingMyFather%2Fvideos%2F1398984187078460%2F&show_text=0&width=560

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